The Rise in Oxalate Sensitivity: Who is Impacted?

Every year, more Americans discover that oxalate sensitivity plays a role in their kidney and urinary tract health.

However, even as kidney health becomes a more pressing issue across demographics, few are familiar with oxalate and the important role oxalate reduction can play in maintaining a healthy urinary tract system.

In this article, we will explore the increasing rates of oxalate sensitivity among different populations. We will also cover how oxalate reduction can be achieved, including innovative approaches, as part of our ongoing efforts to help empower consumers to lead healthier, more nutritious lives.

 

Who Is Affected?

While monitoring kidney health has traditionally been most relevant to middle-aged white men, researchers have found that impacted groups are becoming increasingly widespread.

Between the early 90s and today, the number of people who could benefit from kidney health measures went from one in 20 to one in 10. Of that group, the majority involved oxalate sensitivity. Women saw a striking increase from the late 90s to 2012, while black Americans experienced similar rising rates across roughly that same period.

 

What’s Causing the Rise?

The short answer: we’re not exactly sure.

Researchers haven’t yet determined exactly what’s causing this rise in the relevance of kidney health management tools such as oxalate reduction. So far, efforts have been focused more on documenting the rising numbers of kidney health incidents. However, some researchers believe that rising obesity in the U.S. plays a role. Genetics, water intake, and nutritional balance can also be involved.

 

Oxalate Reduction & Kidney Health

A healthy calcium-oxalate ratio is one of the key factors in maintaining a healthy urinary tract maintenance program. Reducing the amount of oxalate in your diet is one key method to achieving a healthy calcium-oxalate ratio.

Most people are familiar with calcium, the nutrient found largely in dairy products as well as other foods. However, oxalate is less well known. We get oxalate in our diet primarily from eating vegetables such as leafy greens, although it can be found across different food groups. Our bodies also produce oxalate as a product of metabolism. Oxalate doesn’t serve a known nutritional purpose to our bodies; it’s a waste product that the body removes through our urine.

You might already be familiar with oxalate if you or a family member has been advised to follow the “low-oxalate diet” in order to maintain a healthy urinary tract system. More and more, people are adopting this diet as a way to reach a healthy calcium-oxalate ratio and promote their overall nutrition.

Traditionally, the low-oxalate diet involves reducing or eliminating oxalate-packed foods such as spinach, potatoes, avocados, and more. However, important health and nutrition innovations are making it possible to reduce oxalate even while keeping to your regular diet.

 

Innovative Approaches

Scientific research is making great strides in this area. One recent innovation is a patent pending enzyme, naturally derived from algae, which can be used to reduce the oxalate level in foods during food processing or during your regular food preparation. This patent pending enzyme, Nephure™, is anticipated to be available for consumers to purchase in 2017.

 

Your Kidney Health

As with any health matter, it’s important to discuss your individual situation with your doctor. By learning about your diet, family history, and more, your doctor can inform you about your personal kidney and urinary tract health and can best advise you regarding the impact you may see from following the low-oxalate diet.

 


 

Nephure reduces the need for restrictive oxalate-reduction diets so you can indulge in more of your favorite foods. The Nephure enzyme decreases the oxalates in your food to help you maintain a balanced calcium-oxalate ratio, which is part of a healthy kidney and urinary tract program and may provide other health benefits associated with the low oxalate diet.

Note that infants and pregnant or lactating women should not use Nephure™. Those taking medications or are under the care of a doctor should check with their healthcare professional before using Nephure. Keep Nephure™ out of reach of children and pets.

 

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