Low Oxalate Baking Options for Holiday Treats

low oxalate baking  low oxalate flour

‘Tis the season for homemade rolls, cookie exchanges, and lazy holiday morning brunches with muffins, pancakes, and waffles. No matter how you slice it, the holiday months mean baked goods – and lots of them. If you’re on a low oxalate diet, however, many of these mouth-watering carb treats are off-limits – all-purpose, wheat, and wholegrain flours are considered to be oxalate-packed.

Luckily, there are a few medium and low oxalate flours that help place some of these delicious breads and sweets back on the table. Learn more about low oxalate baking options, including rye, soy flour and coconut flour.

RYE ( ½ cup) - Medium

A favorite of bakers in southern Europe and the UK, rye flour is moderate oxalate flour that, when used in baking, contains between 10 and 25 mg oxalate per ½ cup serving. While you’ll still want to eat rye bread in moderation if you’re on a low oxalate diet, using this type of flour in your low oxalate baking can provide a delicious alternative to other types of bread and baked goods.

Due to an abundance of complex sugars called pentosans that break apart easily during mixing, rye bread dough tends to have a sticker consistency. If you’re trying your favorite new homemade rye bread recipe, be sure to mix gently and refrain from over-mixing, which can further break down the pentosans, leading to a sticky, flat bread!

Soy flour (2 Tablespoon) – LOW

More a high-protein powder than a true flour, soy flower is a low oxalate flour option made from dehulled, heat-processed whole soybeans which are very finely ground to create a powder that can boost protein and add moisture to low oxalate baked goods. Soy flour works best in combination with other types of flower – for instance, replacing a portion of all-purpose flour with soy flour for a lower oxalate level per serving.

Soy flour can be used in a variety of foods, or as a replacement for flour in pizza dough, lemon loaf or zucchini bread, or other rich, sweet baked goods. When you’re baking with soy flour, remember to watch your baked goods carefully – soy flour can cause them to brown more quickly.

Coconut flour (1/4 cup) - LOW

Coconut is a favorite among individuals living a low oxalate lifestyle because its dense, sweet and has plenty of fiber (144% of the RDA) and protein according to the recommended daily allowances for a standard diet. Another use, other than sprinkled in yogurt or fruit, is ground coconut flour.  Coconut flour is made from direct coconuts solids ground into a fine, airy powder. This low oxalate flour option is widely available in grocery stores or health food stores, and is used in breads, muffins, and cookies.

Because of the high amount of fiber in coconut flour, you’ll want to use ¼ the amount of it as you would a normal recipe, and also add more milk, water or other liquid to help bind the ingredients together. Eggs are also important to low oxalate baking recipes using coconut flour – without eggs (or something to bind the ingredients) your cookies are more likely to crumble!

With these low oxalate flour alternatives, even those on a low oxalate diet will be able to enjoy the tasty delights of the holiday season.

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