How to Stock your Low-Oxalate Spice Rack

Low-oxalate living doesn’t have to mean tasteless, bland meals. Although your diet may be limited, it doesn’t mean you have to forgo a little spice and seasoning. Like many other things in your low-oxalate life, there are rules for enjoying spices, seasonings and condiments in your meals. Not all spices and seasonings are created equally when it comes to low-oxalate dining, and we’re sharing four accoutrements to spice up your life and help you maintain your low-oxalate diet.

Hot Sauce

spices for low-oxalate fall veggies

Hot sauce is one of the most versatile choices for adding oomph to your meals. Using a base of chili peppers, hot sauce recipes also may include vinegar, salt, capsaicin or other vegetables and fruit. There are hundreds of iterations of this taste-bud tingling treat, with specific flavor profiles depending on the addition ingredients in the sauce. Try it on eggs, chicken or broccoli.

White Pepper

spices for low-oxalate fall veggies

Black pepper is one of the most ubiquitous seasonings in the kitchen, but for those on a low-oxalate diet, white pepper is a better choice. The difference between the white pepper and black pepper is in the processing: black peppercorns are picked when almost ripe and dried in the sun; the outer husk on the white peppercorn is removed, leaving the inner seed. Black and white pepper have similar tastes, although white pepper has a subtle hotness not found in black pepper. Try white pepper in Chinese dishes using Bok Choy, or in mashed cauliflower.

Garlic

spices for low-oxalate fall veggies

Garlic is a darling of the culinary world because of its adaptable flavor profile. Raw garlic has a pungent and incredibly hot taste, but when roasted or cooked, garlic mellows considerably, providing a delicate, slightly sweet flavor. From stir fries to pasta dishes, this low-oxalate herb is a favorite in many types of world cuisine and pairs well with onions, beans, pork and seafood.

Mace

spices for low-oxalate fall veggies

Mace, a cousin of nutmeg, was a favorite for decades until nutmeg and cinnamon stole its thunder as the go-to warm spice. If you’re on a low-oxalate diet, nutmeg and cinnamon are both spices you should consider limiting or avoiding – which is why mace should take its rightful place in your low-oxalate spice rack! Mace has an incredibly deep flavor profile: a mix between nutmeg and coriander, the essence of cinnamon and a twinge of floral. Try mace in sweet dishes like peach cobbler, or on savory meals like chicken and pork.

Keep in mind this simple rule – one that can apply to almost anything in life: everything in moderation. Although these are considered low-oxalate spices, using them in moderation can help you better control your sodium intake, oxalate intake, and other nutritional considerations. Go forth and spice up your meals!

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